Short Story Wednesday

I wrote these short almost non-reviews on my challenge page, but I wanted to give them their own post for Short Story Wednesday, too!

1) The Lottery by Shirley Jackson (1/7/12) – First, just go read it so we can talk about it like civilized people. I mean it, young person! It’s less than 4000 words so it won’t take long. Okay. You’ve read it, right? I really don’t want to spoil it for you. Alright. I don’t actually have a lot to say about it. The creepiest thing is that there’s absolutely no reason given for the lottery. My friend, Leah, who linked it to me, mentioned the Hunger Games, so I didn’t have a growing realization that the lottery wasn’t a happy thing – I pretty much knew it all along. But still. No justification. No religious fertility rite, no making the masses compliant. Just nothing. The Wikipedia page on the story is worthwhile – go read that, too. :P

2) Kolkata Sea by Indrapramit Das (1/10/12) – This story is very short, just over a thousand words, so there’s not a lot for me to say. This future could easily be a dystopia, right? But Das just shows people getting on, which is, imho, how it’s all going to go down. People get on.

I also read Farm 54 this week, which is a graphic novel that is basically comprised of three short stories, so I’m going to include that (which I wrote about on its challenge page), too.

1) Farm 54 by Galit and Gilad Seliktar – This book takes place from the mid? 1970s to the late 1980s and is a semi-autobiographical account of Galit’s growing up in Israel. The main character, Noga, deals with love, sex, a lot of death, and a couple of other themes that I’m having a hard time placing. There’s a strange… Noga doesn’t feel like she has too much agency – perhaps because she is looking back on her life? Maybe because, though she is looking back at her own life, she doesn’t do a lot of introspecting, doesn’t explain why she did what she did. The whole book is very sparse, though that isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

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